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Does the widespread use of mobile phones by young Cambodians affect their studies?

Does the widespread use of mobile phones by young Cambodians affect their studies?

Youth forum

Koy Seda, 47,
chief director at the Toul Tom Pong High School
In my opinion, there are positive and negative points.  On the one hand, young people can save time communicating with their friends. In addition, my students can use mobile phones to surf the web, broaden their information  technology (IT) knowledge, and even to do research.  For those who misuse the technology, mobile phones can have a negative impact.  Mobile-phone service is expensive. And especially during exams, mobile phones can be used for cheating and sharing answers, which is unprincipled.


Loun Leak, 26,
works as call-centre operator at a Global System for Mobile communications (GSM) company.
As long as they know how to get the benefits of the technology without overdoing it, there’s no problem.  Students can use it for research and to consult with friends for educational purposes.  In addition, today’s mobile phones can be used as an electronic dictionary. But mobile phones can be a problem if the student in question does not practise good time management, or uses it in the wrong way.  Some also use their phones for flirting.


Mrs Chan Krim, 52,
a land broker
The use of mobile phones among today’s young people interrupts their studies.  Students need time to study. In my experience, after using mobile phones for 10 years now, I’ve begun to feel pain in my brain, ears and half of my head.  Using mobile phones a lot is also a waste of money.  I think mobile phones are popular with kids who are involved in romantic activities, or flirting.  Using mobile phones a lot is unnecessary for a student.  As a businesswoman, I use mobile phones a lot because I actually need to.


Nop Piseth, 21,
a second-year student​ at Setec University
Use of mobile phones among Cambodian teenagers has many more negative effects than it does positive.  The more mobile phones we use, the more time we waste.  It’s also an expensive hobby – and a waste of money as well, in my opinion.  And if this wasn’t enough, over-use of mobile phones can be a hazard to your health.  It can affect our ears, brains and skin, so don’t hold your mobile phones too close, especially while you’re sleeping.


Tea Malinet, 18
a grade 12 student at Hun Sen Takhmau High School
I believe it totally depends on the person.  Outstanding students, no matter how much time they waste or how many mobile phones they own, will continue to perform well in school.  I experimented with this myself.  I bought two mobile phones (I do love talking with friends) and still managed to pass all my exams with good grades.  Even if they try really hard and don’t waste their time with mobile phones, they still won’t get the same results.

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