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Australia protesters vow to burn Hun Sen effigy

A group of more than 500 Australian-Cambodians has vowed to burn an effigy of Prime Minister Hun Sen, who yesterday threatened to beat protesters in Australia.
A group of more than 500 Australian-Cambodians has vowed to burn an effigy of Prime Minister Hun Sen, who yesterday threatened to beat protesters in Australia. Fresh News

Australia protesters vow to burn Hun Sen effigy

After Prime Minister Hun Sen on Wednesday said he would "beat" any would-be protesters who dared to burn his photo during an upcoming trip to Australia, a group of those would-be protesters have said, thanks for the idea.

In the speech, Hun Sen threatened to boycott the Asean-Australian Special Summit on March 17 and 18, before issuing a menacing word of warning to would-be protesters in Australia.

“I would like to send a message, do not burn my photo," he said. "If you burn my photo, I will follow you home ... I will follow you and beat you at home."

He added, “I want to be clear, you have your right to burn my image. I have my right to fight you, so it’s fine … I will go to your houses and seize you.”

Cambodian-Australian Melbourne resident Va Malina said she would be joining demonstrations next month to coincide with Hun Sen's visit, and that the protests would now include burning an effigy of Hun Sen – thanks to the premier's suggestion.

“We didn’t plan to burn Hun Sen’s effigy, but he is the one who reminded us yesterday,” she said.

The protests will call for the release of jailed opposition leader Kem Sokha and demand the reinstatement of his party – which was forcibly dissolved in November – before the July 29 national election. While organisers had initially planned for some 500 people to protest across the country, following Hun Sen's inflammatory words, more are now expected to turn out.

Malina said Hun Sen would not be able to deliver on his “cruel and violent” threats because of Australian law and condemnation from the international community.

“You have no right to beat or punish us here,” she said.

Hong Lim, an Australian state lawmaker from Victoria who was born in Cambodia, announced he would join the protesters too, and said Australians were entitled to peacefully protest.

“The whole irony is that this event he’s coming to attend is about Australia and Asean jointly fighting against terrorism … and the terrorist Hun Sen is threatening to bring terrorism into Australia," Lim said.

”He’s gone mad. He’s threatening Australian citizens on Australian soil,” he added. “To threaten anyone with bodily harm is an offence.”

The Australian Embassy and the Department of Foreign Affairs did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Updates to follow.

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