Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Poipet roadblock for would-be registrants

Poipet roadblock for would-be registrants

Poipet roadblock for would-be registrants

More than 300 Cambodian workers living in Thailand were prevented from registering to vote in Banteay Meanchey province’s Poipet town on Sunday after being unable to provide proof of residence there, officials said.

The workers crossed from Thailand but were unable to register at different registration booths because they did not live in the border town or have witnesses vouching for their residence, said Mean Sarith, chief of the Cambodia National Rescue Party’s working group in Poipet.

“The authorities said they can only register if they are living in Poipet and it was impossible to [register] people from other provinces,” Sarith said, adding that about 60 workers were able to register to vote after authorities determined that they maintained residences in Poipet.

Chao Veasna and Kun Chanty, deputy chiefs for the city’s Poipet commune and Phsa Kandal commune, respectively, said they each turned away about 50 workers hoping to register to vote in next year’s commune elections.

However, Poipet Town Governor Ngor Meng Chruon said that no more than 10 workers had been turned away in total.

“This is an exaggeration. We did not register them because they lack adequate documents,” he said.National Election Committee spokesman Hang Puthea said there were no special provisions for migrant workers without personal or family residences in Cambodia to register in border towns.

“This is the law. Whether it is fair or not – let both [political] parties solve it, because they decide the law,” Puthea said. Yet he added that if workers did stay in Cambodia for even a day and had authorities certify their stay, officials had been instructed to register them.

The CNRP has estimated that more than 1 million Cambodians work in Thailand. In the run-up to registration, the NEC said eligible voters would have to register in the communes listed or their national identity cards, or near their local workplaces if witnesses confirmed their residence.

Moeun Tola, head of worker rights group Central, said it was unfair to expect workers to go back to their home provinces to register, given their limited resources and time.

“The government could have set up 25 booths, one for each province, and let workers cross over and register in the appropriate booth,” Tola said, adding that he believed there was little will to aid migrant workers in registering.

Additional reporting by Ananth Baliga

MOST VIEWED

  • Massive stingrays may live in Mekong’s deep pools

    US scientists have suggested that unexplored deep pools in the Mekong River in an area of Stung Treng could potentially be home to significant populations of giant freshwater stingrays, one of the world’s largest freshwater fish species. This comes as a fisherman hooked a 180

  • PM takes time to meet, greet Cambodians living in the US

    After landing in the US ahead of the ASEAN-US Special Summit, Prime Minister Hun Sen was received by over 1,000 Cambodian-Americans including political analysts who welcomed him with greetings, fist bumps and selfies. Hun Sen also met with analyst Mak Hoeun, who had allegedly spoken ill

  • PM heads to Washington for ASEAN-US special summit

    Regional and international issues and how to bring the ASEAN-US partnership to another level will be discussed at length as Prime Minister Hun Sen and his ministers arrive in Washington, DC, for a special summit on May 12-13. During the trip, Hun Sen and ASEAN

  • National Assembly refutes EU resolution

    The National Assembly (NA) has hit back at a European Parliament resolution condemning the political and human rights situation in Cambodia, calling it another display of the Parliament’s “double standards”. Key points of the resolution include a warning that the Parliament could exclude the

  • Soaring global fuel prices: an opportunity for Cambodia?

    Cambodia is feeling the squeeze from the soaring global coal and oil prices. Electricity du Cambodge (EDC)would certainly be hurting from this reality, and most likely re-assessing its plans to add more coal power stations. EDC buys half of Cambodia’s electricity from plants

  • PM reflects on shoe throwing: Free speech or act of violence?

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on May 17 questioned whether a man who threw a shoe at him while he was in the US was exercising freedom of expression or if it was an act of hostility. Hun Sen was referring to an incident last week when