Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Climate change may undermine Kingdom’s mango production

Climate change may undermine Kingdom’s mango production

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
A man carries mangoes in a boat in Lvea Em district’s Arey Ksat commune in Kandal province on September 6, 2018. Heng Chivoan

Climate change may undermine Kingdom’s mango production

Mango production is expected to decrease this year as climate change severely impacts yields, according to a mango association in Kampong Speu province – the Kingdom’s largest regional producer of the fruit.

Kampong Speu Mangoes Association president In Chayvan said the impact of climate change could reduce yields by around 50 per cent this year.

“Mango production this year will not be as good as last year as effects of climate change – too much rain and too much drought – will reduce yields this year,” he said, adding that the main yearly harvest will begin next month.

“Due to climate change, [mango] flowers were destroyed by too much rain and now there is drought coming. The ponds in some areas are slowly drying up,” he said.

Drought worries

The government last month issued a statement raising concerns of a drought, as El Nino threatens to cast a prolonged dry spell when it hits the Kingdom in April and May.

However, he said prices were currently rising faster than during the same period last year.

“The price is not fluctuating as much as last year. [We] are seeing more demand from Vietnamese buyers,” he said, adding that the association has made contracts with buyers in Vietnam this year at 1,500 riel ($0.37) per kg.

“The mango market is not a challenge for us as we already have a processing factory, so the demand for mangoes already exists,” he said. “What we need to do is promote the awareness of technical farming and building farmers’ confidence in the market through contract farming.”

The installation of a Hyundai-owned fruit treatment facility in Kampong Speu province was completed this month, with mangoes set for export to South Korea. The company plans to export 1,700 tonnes in its first year of operation.

Kim La, a Kampong Speu province mango farmer and an association members, said her 5ha mango farm yielded 60 tonnes in last season’s harvest.

However, she said yields will not increase this harvest season – starting from March – as the weather is currently too hot.

“I am now concerned about the coming season, as the weather is really hot and dry. I am afraid my mango trees cannot yield big fruit,” she said.

MOST VIEWED

  • Police seek arrest of Chinese ‘gang’

    Cambodian police remain on the lookout for 20 Chinese nationals who earlier this month posted a video clip threatening to stoke insecurity in Preah Sihanouk province, though the Chinese Embassy in Phnom Penh maintained the group posed no threats to Cambodia’s national security. National Police

  • Man arrested for fake PM endorsement

    The owner of currency exchange company GCG Asia Co Ltd was temporarily detained by the court yesterday for attempted fraud after Prime Minister Hun Sen reacted to the company using his name and pictures to allege his endorsement of the firm. Phnom Penh Municipal Court

  • Rapper deletes song critical of Cambodian social issues

    A young musician has deleted from Facebook and YouTube a rap song that was critical of Cambodia’s social issues and announced that he will stop singing the song after officials visited his home in Siem Reap province and allegedly gave him a warning. Provincial

  • Sihanoukville authority orders structure dismantled

    The Preah Sihanouk provincial administration has ordered owners of two unauthorised construction sites to immediately dismantle them and warned of legal action if the owners failed to comply. Ly Chet Niyom, development management and construction bureau chief at the provincial hall, told The Post on