Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - NEC announces local elections set for May 26

NEC announces local elections set for May 26

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
Khmer Will Party members celebrate at an event marking the party’s first anniversary. Heng Chivoan

NEC announces local elections set for May 26

The National Election Committee (NEC) has announced that the upcoming third mandate municipal, provincial, town and district council elections will be held on May 26.

Seven political parties are to participate. Those without councillors eligible to vote were still able to take part in polls that one party president said would “make Cambodian democracy vibrant”.

National Election Committee (NEC) spokesperson Hang Puthea said on Sunday that the elections were important as Cambodia is on the path of democracy, where power comes from citizens who follow the performance of the government.

“The more councils, the better for monitoring the government’s activities,” Puthea said.

He said the parties that obtained the most votes would get positions as heads of the councils, with the power to make important decisions affecting local government. Governors, who are appointed by the government, must consult with council chiefs before any decision is made.

The elections are scheduled to be held following an election campaign lasting a week from last Friday to May 24.

As of Sunday, six parties had begun campaigning – the ruling Cambodian People’s Party, the Cambodian Youth Party, Funcinpec, the Khmer United Party and the Cambodian Nationality Party.

The Khmer Republican Party of Lon Rith, the son of Lon Nol, who overthrew Prince Norodom Sihanouk as prime minister in a coup in 1970, was yet to begin campaigning.

The president of the Khmer Will Party, Kong Monika, said on Sunday that his party had been established for only one year as of Sunday and so did not have any eligible voters.

However, he expressed hope that it would receive votes from members of other parties.

“We have decided to participate in the elections. First, we want multiple parties to participate to make Cambodian democracy vibrant. We do not want democracy to stay quiet after the former Cambodia National Rescue Party was dissolved. We are a new party made up of lovers of democracy.

“We want democracy to be vibrant, so we are participating in the elections despite having no eligible voters. But we are hopeful that though most voters belong to the ruling party, some of them will voice their support for the Khmer Will Party because it has made constructive criticism for the benefit of the nation."

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
Khmer Will Party campaigners drive along Sothearos Boulevard in Phnom Penh. Heng Chivoan

“I think that having a single ruling party is not effective governance, so other parties should support democracy by constructively criticising the government to benefit the Kingdom’s development,” Monika said.

Seng Sokheng, the president of the Cambodia Nationality Party, said similarly that although his party had only 10 voters, it was taking part in the elections to uphold Cambodian democracy.

“We hope that other parties will participate in the democratic process to join the government and contribute to the safeguarding of the nation’s peace and development. So in the days to come, I hope we will see positive results,” he said.

Although some parties did not have any eligible voters, they had decided to take part in the elections in line with Cambodian democracy and the Kingdom’s constitution, he said.

A total of 203 polling stations will open their doors for the elections in Phnom Penh and 24 provincial capitals.

Some 11,500 commune council members across the country are eligible to vote. The elections are to be divided into two. One vote will elect 559 municipal and provincial councillors, while the other will decide 3,555 town and district council seats.

The 11,572 voters taking part are to use two types of ballot – yellow for electing town and district councils, with votes cast in one ballot box. White ballots are to be used for electing municipal and provincial councillors. Votes will be cast in another box.

MOST VIEWED

  • Hun Sen: Full country reopening to be decided in two weeks

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has announced that if the Covid-19 situation remains stable for 15 consecutive days from the end of the October 5-7 Pchum Ben public holiday, Cambodia will reopen fully, albeit in the context of Covid-19 whereby people have to adjust their lives to

  • Cambodia sets new Covid-19 quarantine rules

    The government has modified Covid-19 quarantine requirements, shortening the duration for, among others, Cambodian officials, foreign diplomats and delegations, investors and inbound travellers in general. According to an official notice signed by Minister of Health Mam Bun Heng late on October 16, quarantine length for Cambodian

  • Will Evergrande change the way Chinese developers do business in Cambodia?

    China’s property sector policy has exposed the grim financial condition of real estate developers including those operating in Cambodia, which raises questions over the viability of their projects and business going forward The dark blue netting draping over one of Yuetai Group Co Ltd’

  • Phnom Penh governor: Show Covid-19 vaccination cards, or else

    Phnom Penh municipal governor Khuong Sreng late on October 5 issued a directive requiring all people aged 18 and over and the parents of children aged 6-17 to produce Covid-19 vaccination cards when entering schools, markets, malls, marts, eateries and other business establishments that have been permitted

  • Cambodia seeks probe into 'false reports' on Hun Sen's alleged Cypriot passport

    Minister of Justice Koeut Rith on September 6 wrote a letter to his Cypriot counterpart Stephie Dracos requesting cooperation in investigating and providing the truth in relation to the "exaggerative and false allegations" that Prime Minister Hun Sen holds a Cypriot passport. In his letter, the

  • 'Pandora Papers' expose leaders' offshore millions

    More than a dozen heads of state and government, from Jordan to Azerbaijan, Kenya and the Czech Republic, have used offshore tax havens to hide assets worth hundreds of millions of dollars, according to a far-reaching new investigation by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (