Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Phnom Tamao Zoological Park breed Gaur, world’s heaviest wild bovine

Phnom Tamao Zoological Park breed Gaur, world’s heaviest wild bovine

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
The female gaur that was born on January 5. PHNOM Tamao Zoological Park and Wildlife Rescue Centre

Phnom Tamao Zoological Park breed Gaur, world’s heaviest wild bovine

Phnom Tamao Zoological Park and Wildlife Rescue Centre has successfully bred a pair of gaur, the world’s heaviest wild bovine, which are listed on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List as one of the most vulnerable species in the world.

In early January, a six-year old gaur gave birth to its first baby – a female – increasing the number of gaur in the zoo to seven. The mother gaur was the product of breeding between a male from the Paris Zoo in France and a female gaur from Mondulkiri province.

Yong Ratana, deputy head of the zoo’s conservation office, told The Post on February 2 that the January 5 birth was a great achievement for the centre. The father was a gaur from Battambang province, he added.

He said it was the fourth baby gaur that the zoo’s breeding experts – in collaboration with the Forestry Administration and Wildlife Alliance – had delivered since 2016. There were now four male and three female of the species at the zoo.

“This newborn gaur has given hope to our team, and boosted our confidence in improving the prosperity of rare species’ in Cambodia,” he said.

This March, a female gaur in Mondulkiri is due to give birth, after being bred with a male from France in May last year. The gaur from Paris has produced three offspring since 2016, two of which are male, he added.

He said that in addition to the successful gaur breeding programme, they had bred other rare and endangered species such as reindeer, leopard and fishing cats, banteng cattle, and the binturong, sometimes referred to as the bearcat. Porcupines and sambar deer had also been born at the facility, he added.

Try Sitheng, head keeper at the centre, said breeding wildlife is not easy as it requires time and careful study of the biological characteristics of each species in order to ensure success.

“It’s not just gaurs – with any animal, we have to take the time to study them carefully before we can breed them. Our subsequent success has been a driving force in motivating our team to continue their mission to restore or increase the number of rare species in Cambodia,” Sitheng said.

Yoeun Noeun, who is responsible for caring for the gaurs at the zoo, said the presence of the new gaur has inspired him.

“I was really happy to see the new baby, and I am pleased that both mother and child are healthy. The presence of this new baby has made me love my job even more because we are helping to increase the population of rare animals here in the Kingdom and this means the next generation will know these magnificent creatures,” he said.

MOST VIEWED

  • Research key to Kanitha’s rep for expertise

    Sok Kanitha is used to weighing in on controversial issues using a confident approach that signals expertise and authority, and a recent video she made was no exception. Her “Episode 342: The History of NATO” video went live on January 16, 2023 and immediately shot to 30,000 likes and 3,500

  • Cambodia maintains 'Kun Khmer' stance despite Thailand’s boycott threat

    Cambodia has taken the position that it will use the term "Kun Khmer" to refer to the sport of kickboxing at the upcoming Southeast Asian (SEA) Games, and has removed the term Muay from all references to the sport. Despite strong reactions from the Thai

  • Knockout! Kun Khmer replaces ‘Muay’ for Phnom Penh Games

    Cambodia has decided to officially remove the word Muay from the programme of the 32nd Southeast Asian (SEA) Games 2023 in May. “Kun Khmer” will instead be used to represent the Southeast Asian sport of kickboxing, in accordance with the wishes of the Cambodian people. Vath

  • Artificial insemination takes herd from 7 to 700

    Some farms breed local cows or even import bulls from a broad for the purpose of breeding heavier livestock for meat production. One Tbong Khnum farmer has found a more efficient way. Hout Leang employs artificial insemination to fertilise local cows. Thanks to imported “straws”

  • New int’l airport nearly half complete as travel industry returns to life

    Construction of a new airport that is slated to serve the capital has passed the 43 per cent completion mark, raising prospects for a proper recovery in the civil aviation and tourism sectors as international travellers return to the Kingdom in increasingly large numbers. The figure

  • Chinese group tours return to Cambodia starting Feb 6

    Cambodia is among 20 countries selected by Beijing for a pilot programme allowing travel agencies to provide international group tours as well as flight and hotel packages to Chinese citizens, following a three-year ban. As the days tick down until the programme kicks off on February 6,